DAILY DEVOTION-OCTOBER 26 2017

Investing in Eternity
Matthew 28:18-20
The Christian life is an active life—one dedicated to working, serving, sharing, and helping. Too often we think that being a believer simply means showing up for church each Sunday morning and dropping something into the offering plate. That’s a good habit, but if it’s the sum of your commitment, you’ve missed the mark.
There is a call that the Lord put on everyone who would follow Him—namely, He’s called us to go into the world and make disciples. You may say, “Well, that applies just to missionaries and ministers, right?” No. Teaching others about the Savior is the responsibility of all who claim the name of Jesus.
Just look at the first word of Matthew 28:19. What does Jesus say? His charge to us is “Go!” In today’s terms, He’s saying, “Get out of your comfort zone. Go love someone who’s different than you. Get up, look at the world around you, and tell someone about Me.”
This is not a suggestion. Nor is it a word to only a handful of believers. If you’ve been saved by the blood of Christ, then Jesus is talking to you!
Making disciples doesn’t mean you must quit your job and become a full-time missionary to some remote region. But you could walk outside, knock on a neighbor’s door, and demonstrate the love of Christ to that person. You don’t need a show-stopping sermon to minister to others; you simply need a willing, open heart.
What can you do right now to make disciples? Think about the steps you can take today to respond to God’s call on your life.


dAILY DEVOTION-OCTOBER 23 2017

Your word is a lamp for my feet, a light on my path.
Psalm 119:105 NIV


daily Devotion-October 22 2017

The Wisdom of Right Relationships
Hebrews 10:23-24
The subject of positive relationships is near to my heart because the Lord has provided me with dependable friends. These are the people who challenge me to do more for God. My friends love me, but they certainly aren’t content to let me stay as I am! If they spot a sin in my life or see something I could do better, they say so.
Paul gave relationships a high priority, too. The apostle surrounded himself with people who could help him achieve two things: fulfillment of his God-given mission and conformity to Christlikeness. While Paul was pouring himself into the lives of others, he was being built up and strengthened by fellow believers. That, in brief, is the Lord’s plan for every one of His children.
What about you? Do you have certain relationships that motivate you to pursue God more fervently? It does matter whom we allow to influence our lives. The Father equips your brothers and sisters to invest in you—to encourage you, pray for you, and prod you toward a more complete faith—so you are prepared to devote yourself to serving others. Good relationships with people who build each other up can help believers fulfill God’s plan for their life.
The finest relationships are between people who want to see each other succeed in faith and therefore “spur one another on toward love and good deeds” (Heb. 10:24 NIV). In other words, our best friends are those who love us as we are but never stop pointing us to the Lord and challenging us toward excellence.


daily devotion-october 21 2017

THE FREEDOM OF SALVATION
Galatians 3:10-13, Galatians 3:21-24
Most of us are accustomed to working for a reward. We get paid for a completed job, and there’s a bonus when our effort exceeds expectation. It’s understandable, then, why so many people assume salvation depends upon our actions. But thankfully, that is simply not the case.
God gave commandments to reveal His standard for holiness, but—with the exception of Jesus—no one has ever obeyed them perfectly. In fact, James 2:10 points out that “whoever keeps the whole law and yet stumbles in one point, he has become guilty of all.” Just one single jealous thought, unkind comment, or dishonoring action is all it takes to be a lawbreaker, according to God’s specifications. In other words, if salvation depended on our inadequate self-righteousness, nobody could be saved. God’s laws weren’t intended to save us; rather, they were intended to show our helplessness and point us to Jesus Christ (Gal. 3:24).
Our heavenly Father knew that our own strength was insufficient for keeping His law. Yet out of grace, He sent His sinless Son Jesus to take the penalty we deserved for our wrongdoing—death (Rom. 6:23). The Savior bore our iniquities, died, and rose from the grave. In doing so, He conquered sin so we can be free.
Jesus’ death and resurrection broke the bonds of sin. Are you living in the freedom His blood made possible? We can do nothing to reconcile ourselves to God; our only hope is to accept the free gift of the sacrifice Jesus made on our behalf. In surrendering our life to Him, we find genuine liberation.


daily devotion-October 20 2012

Prescription for Life
If any one intends to come after Me, let him deny himself [forget, ignore, disown and lose sight of himself and his own interests] and take up his cross, and…follow with Me. For whoever wants to save his [higher, spiritual, eternal] life, will lose it…and whoever gives up his life [which is lived only on earth] for My sake and the Gospel’s will save [it].
Mark 8:34-35, The Amplified Bible
When Jesus said those words, He wasn’t just giving us a prescription for getting to heaven. He was telling us how to live a superior life right here on earth.
You see, there’s a high life that we can live right here, right now. But to get in on it, we have to lay down the way of life that most of us are accustomed to. We may have to let go of the very things we’ve been trying so hard to latch on to. We have to set our hearts instead on doing what God wants us to do.
That’s what Jesus did. He didn’t live His life for Himself. He lived it completely for God. He did only what the Father told Him to do—and He lived in total victory.
It’s time to realize that getting born again is not something we do just to miss hell. Our purpose is to please God—to lay down our lives in order to fulfill His desires. To be His special possessions in the earth and to do whatever He tells us to do. Our top priority is to give ourselves to Him and to live in communication with Him. To spend enough time with Him that we can hear His voice and respond in obedience.
Only when we do that will we be genuinely fulfilled. Only when we do that will we be able to live the high life we’ve been longing for.
Scripture Reading:
Acts 20:7-24


daily devotion-October 19 2017

The Reward of the Believer..Be selfless in all you do.
1 Corinthians 3:6-15
Our God-given purpose is to glorify our heavenly Father. Ephesians 2:10 sheds light on the means by which we accomplish this: “For we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works.”
As believers, we are responsible to do God’s work. One day, we will stand before the judgment seat of Christ and be held accountable for our service. “Judgment” can be a daunting term. Remember, though, that Jesus redeemed us by His death and resurrection and paid the penalty for our sins. He took our punishment, and we no longer face condemnation (Rom. 8:1). Christ’s judgment for Christians determines His rewards for each believer.
During this evaluation, God will test our actions. Today’s Scripture passage likens this to proving the quality of a substance through fire (1 Corinthians 3:12-15). Once the fire burns away impure motives and worthless tasks, the Lord will give recompense for that which remains.
From the outside, we may look as if we’re living obediently, striving to honor Jesus. So many tasks appear selfless and honorable, yet underneath the noble appearance, there can be ugly motives. We often deceive even ourselves about the reason for our actions. Since our desire should be to please Christ, we can ask Him to purify and change our hearts.
Consider your actions over the past few days. How much time and energy did you spend serving Christ for His glory? This can include any area of involvement—not just efforts related to church. Ask God to reveal whatever is driven by a selfish motive and needs to be brought under His authority
1 Corinthians 3:6-15
Our God-given purpose is to glorify our heavenly Father. Ephesians 2:10 sheds light on the means by which we accomplish this: “For we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works.”
As believers, we are responsible to do God’s work. One day, we will stand before the judgment seat of Christ and be held accountable for our service. “Judgment” can be a daunting term. Remember, though, that Jesus redeemed us by His death and resurrection and paid the penalty for our sins. He took our punishment, and we no longer face condemnation (Rom. 8:1). Christ’s judgment for Christians determines His rewards for each believer.
During this evaluation, God will test our actions. Today’s Scripture passage likens this to proving the quality of a substance through fire (1 Corinthians 3:12-15). Once the fire burns away impure motives and worthless tasks, the Lord will give recompense for that which remains.
From the outside, we may look as if we’re living obediently, striving to honor Jesus. So many tasks appear selfless and honorable, yet underneath the noble appearance, there can be ugly motives. We often deceive even ourselves about the reason for our actions. Since our desire should be to please Christ, we can ask Him to purify and change our hearts.
Consider your actions over the past few days. How much time and energy did you spend serving Christ for His glory? This can include any area of involvement—not just efforts related to church. Ask God to reveal whatever is driven by a selfish motive and needs to be brought under His authority


daily devotion-October 18 2017

From Tradition to Truth
Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits: who forgiveth all thine iniquities; who healeth all thy diseases; who redeemeth thy life from destruction; who crowneth thee with lovingkindness and tender mercies; who satisfieth thy mouth with good things; so that thy youth is renewed like the eagle’s.
Psalm 103:2-5
Is there actually a divine purpose behind the bad things that happen in your life? Could it be that the sicknesses and calamities you experience are somehow a part of God’s plan for you?
Before you can ever begin to experience the healing, delivering power of God, you’ve got to know the answer to those questions. You have to settle them once and for all. If you even suspect that God is the source of your misfortunes, you won’t be able to believe Him for deliverance from them. Your faith will be crippled because you’ll think that by escaping those things, you’ll be opposing His will.
In order to receive all the benefits God desires to give you, you must be absolutely sure that He is a good God. You must be certain that His will for you is health, not sickness; prosperity, not poverty; happiness, not sorrow—100 percent of the time! Psalms 103 alone is enough to prove that’s true. But if it’s not enough to convince you, there are many others too. One of the best known verses is Psalms 136:1 that says, “O give thanks unto the Lord; for he is good: for his mercy endureth for ever.”
If religious traditions have robbed you of the goodness of God, if they’ve taught you He brings trouble into your life so He can teach you something, start today washing those traditions away with the truth. Get out your Bible and let God Himself tell you through His own Word that He is the God who heals you (Exodus 15:26). Dig in to the Scriptures and discover for yourself that He is a God of mercy (Psalms 86:5), lovingkindness (Jeremiah 9:24), and compassion (Psalms 145:8).
Put your doubts to rest and open your heart to receive the truth about your heavenly Father. It’s the only thing that can truly set you free.
Scripture Reading:
Psalm 89:1-28


daily devotion-october 17 2017

Living the Love Life
Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.
John 15:13
We often think of “laying down your life” for someone else in terms of dying. That’s what Jesus did. He loved us so much He laid down His life by dying in our place so that we could live.
But now, He’s asked us to lay down our lives in a different way. He’s asked us to show our love, not by dying for others, but by living for them.
Exactly what does that mean?
Sometimes it means giving our lives by spending time in prayer for someone. Other times it means giving of ourselves with love and understanding. Many times it means laying down our own selfish desires in order to meet the needs of another.
Romans 15:1 puts it this way, “We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves.”
When you lay down your life, you live to please God instead of yourself. You let your life be guided by His love. If love leads you to the person next door, you follow. When love calls you to intercede for someone in need, you yield.
Commit yourself today to lay down your own life—and take up the love life. Say:
“Father, in Jesus’ Name, I see from Your Word that You were willing to give of Yourself, in the person of Your Son, for all men. I understand that because Jesus is Lord of my life, I, too, am called to give myself to others. I choose to accept that calling today.
“I’ll give of my time. I’ll give of Your love in me. I’ll be strong and lift up those who are weak. I’m willing to be available to be used of You so that those around me might experience the abundant life You have provided.
“You have loved me, Lord, with the greatest love there is. I count it a privilege now to share that love with others. I thank You for it in Jesus’ Name. Amen.”
Scripture Reading:
Galatians 5:22-26, Galatians 6:1


daily devotion-october 16 2017

Philippians 4:8 (NIV)
Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable–if anything is excellent or praiseworthy–think about such things.
“Train Our Thoughts”
In a March 15, 2012 issue of Science Daily, the University of Wisconsin-Madison published an article entitled “A wandering mind reveals mental processes and priorities.” Their studies found that our minds wander half the day, drifting off into thoughts unrelated to what we’re doing. In fact, you may not even make it all the way through todays devotional without thinking about something else.
What’s my point? Just as easily as our minds wander for half the day; it’s also easy for our minds to stray into natural thinking, which causes our faith to subtly fade. Without concisely training our thoughts to stay on God, we will begin to think using a natural wisdom instead of Kingdom reality.
Paul didn’t need the findings of the University of Wisconsin-Madison to understand and speak to the hearts of the people of Philippi and us in today’s verse. He only needed to know that the enemy attacks our thought life (Romans 7:21-23). In today’s verse Paul admonishes us to stay vigilant and train our thoughts to stay focused on God.
This Weeks Prayer:
“Father, Thank You for empowering me through Your word. Help me to train my thoughts to stay focused on You, and Your plans for my life. In Jesus name. Amen!”


daily devotion-October 15 2017

If I use what I’ve got God will build what I’m not that’s a word


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